Wine List

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Region Vintage Name Qty Unit Case Format Price Note Ratingsort descending
Madeira 1977 Blandy's Bual

[original gift box]

1 Bottle 75cl £95
Italy 2008 Isole e Olena, Cabernet Sauvignon, Collezione Privata

1 Case 6 75cl £275
Italy 2011 Salicutti Brunello di Montalcino

1 Case 6 75cl £215
Italy 1998 Dal Forno Romana Amarone della Valpolicella

1 Bottle 75cl £325
Italy 1964 Borgogno Barolo

[Duty Paid]

8 Bottle 75cl £80
Italy 2004 Felsina Chianti Classico Riserva

2 Case 6 75cl £190
Italy 1975 Biondi Santi Brunello di Montalcino Riserva

3 Case 6 75cl £3,200
Italy 2001 Sassicaia

1 Case 6 75cl £1,400
  • Rating

    87

    Release Price

    NA

    Drink Date

    2017 - 2022

    Reviewed by

     Monica Larner

    Issue Date

    28th Apr 2017

    Source

    230, The Wine Advocate

    Compared to the 2002 vintage that seems serendipitously suspended in time, the 2001 Bolgheri Sassicaia is in a more significant downward decline. The 2002 vintage was widely-panned. Back in the day, the 2001 vintage was given a full five stars for excellence. Despite the accolades, this wine does not have much life to give. The bouquet shows aromas of cured meat, petrol, smoke, dried herb and dusty earth. The primary aromas have left the building. The mouthfeel is dry and quickly flat-lining.

Tasting Notes
87
Italy 2012 San Guido Le Difese

1 Case 6 75cl £60
  • The 2012 Le Difese is a bright and fruit-forward blend of Cabernet Sauvignon (70%) and Sangiovese (aged one year in oak) that shows a point of ripe fruit or strawberry at the very start. There’s a frank simplicity to this wine that makes it a pleasure to drink without too much contemplation. That solid core of ripe fruit is embellished by soft contours of spice and tobacco.

Tasting Notes
88
Italy 2013 Ornellaia Poggio alle Gazze (Sauv. Bl.)

[US Slip Labels]

2 Case 6 75cl £180
  • Wine Spectator 88

    Poggio alle Gazze dell’Ornellaia, owes its elegant Mediterranean style to the Estate’s unique microclimate. This gift of nature allows Poggio alle Gazze dell’Ornellaia, with its predominance of Sauvignon Blanc, to display a firm structure and ripe fruit while maintaining great finesse.

     

Tasting Notes
88
Italy 2012 Isole e Olena Chardonnay Privata

1 Case 6 75cl £195
  • Rating 89

    Drink Date 2015 - 2022

    Reviewed by Monica Larner

    Issue Date 30th Oct 2015

    Source 221, The Wine Advocate

    The 2012 Chardonnay Collezione Privata was slightly reduced when I first tasted it, so I asked Paolo De Marchi if I could take the open bottle back to my hotel to taste it a few hours later. When I did, I found that the wine had opened considerably and those flinty, volcanic tones had blown off. The bouquet shows apricot, cantaloupe melon and white almond paste. There is a natural creaminess to the wine that makes it very attractive once it gets revved up. Make sure you give this wine ample time to breathe.

    There is no way not to be totally overwhelmed by the stunning beauty of the tiny twin hamlets of Isole and Olena that straddle either side of this historic property. Paolo De Marchi's enthusiastic and engaging personality defines the landmark set of wines before you.

Tasting Notes
89
Italy 2012 Guidalberto San Guido

1 Case 6 75cl £135
  • Rating 91

    Drink Date 2015 - 2024

    Reviewed by Monica Larner

    Issue Date 31st Oct 2014

    Source 215, The Wine Advocate

    The 2012 Guidalberto (Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot) impresses for the approachable, yet intriguing, delivery of fruit. The style is fruit-forward and ripe, yet the wine is not banal. There’s a fluidity to the bouquet that brings it to cherry and blackberry with soft tones of leather and tobacco woven deep within. The mouthfeel is voluptuous and rich without feeling heavy or flat. The 2012 vintage shows good energy and verve, with a long flavor trail of chocolate and toasted espresso that leaves a favorable mark.

Tasting Notes
91
Italy 2007 Felsina Chianti Classico Riserva

2 Case 6 75cl £225
  • The 2007 Chianti Classico Riserva emerges with hints of smoke, underbrush, licorice, leather and wild cherries. The wine gains volume and depth in the glass as its sheer pedigree emerges over time. There is plenty of muscle to back up the delicate aromatics in a striking balance of elegance and power, all in an essentially classic, mid-weight style. The round, deeply satisfying finish makes it hard to put the glass down.

Tasting Notes
91
Italy 2012 Le Serre Nuove Tenuta dell'Ornellaia

1 Case 6 150cl £350
  • Rating

    92

    Release Price

    NA

    Drink Date

    2015 - 2028

    Reviewed by

     Monica Larner

    Issue Date

    31st Oct 2014

    Source

    215, The Wine Advocate

    The 2012 Bolgheri Le Serre Nuove is a voluptuous and generous wine that bursts forth with wild-cherry aromas, blackberry, crème de cassis, oak spice and smoke. The blend of grapes this year is 52% Merlot, 28% Cabernet Sauvignon, 8% Cabernet Franc and 12% Petit Verdot. It awards pleasure and smoothness, thanks to its plump tannins and ripe fruit overtones. Le Serre Nuove shows the acidity and structure for ten years or more of cellar aging.

Tasting Notes
92
Italy 2000 Ornellaia

1 Case 6 75cl £940
  • Nothing in particular stands out about the 2000 Ornellaia, instead the whole is clearly greater than the sum of its parts. This blend of 65% Cabernet Sauvignon, 30% Merlot and 5% Cabernet Franc is a seamless beauty, showing exceptional purity with notable length on the palate and no hard edges. While the 2000 may not have the structure or complexity of the best vintages it will provide exceptional drinking now and to age 15, give or take.

    Score: 92Antonio Galloni, vinous.com, March 2007

Tasting Notes
92
Italy 1990 Rampolla Sammarco

1 Case 6 75cl £575
  • Rating

    93

    Release Price

    $45

    Drink Date

    1997 - 2010

    Reviewed by

    Robert M. Parker, Jr.

    Issue Date

    28th Apr 1995

    Source

    98, The Wine Advocate

    The 1990 Sammarco may prove to be a worthy rival to the glorious 1985. The saturated ruby/purple/garnet color is followed by an intense yet youthful fragrance of ripe black fruits, vanillin, and minerals. Full-bodied, rich, beautifully delineated and structured, it possesses considerable body, tannin, and extract. Although accessible, it is extremely young and ideally should have another 2-4 years of cellaring. It should age well for 15+ years. As I have said many times, Sammarco always reminds me of a top Graves, because of the tobacco/mineral component it often displays. This outstanding Tuscan producer has been exceptionally consistent over the last decade, so it is not surprising that the 1990s performed brilliantly. Importer: Vias Imports, New York, NY; Tel. (212) 629-0200

Tasting Notes
93
Italy 2006 Roagna Barbaresco Crichet Paje

1 Case 6 75cl £3,600
  • The 2006 Barbaresco Crichët Pajé is one of the most open, accessible vintages of this wine I can remember tasting. But it's still Roagna, which means the wine is powerful and structured, but less so than is typically the case. Iron, smoke, incense, tobacco, autumn leaves and a host of ferrous, savory notes are some of the signatures. As is sometimes the case here, extended time in barrel has dried out the fruit a bit. This is a style that personally gives me less pleasure, although, as the saying goes, your mileage may vary.

    -- Antonio Galloni

Tasting Notes
93
Italy 2003 Pira & Figli Barolo Cannubi Chiara Boschis -

5 Bottle 75cl £65
93
Italy 1995 Fontodi Flaccianello della Pieve

2 Case 6 75cl £520
93
Italy 2003 Mascarello Barolo Monprivato

[Duty Paid]

1 Bottle 75cl £120
  • Rating

    93

    Release Price

    $94

    Drink Date

    2008 - 2023

    Reviewed by

    Antonio Galloni

    Issue Date

    31st Oct 2007

    Source

    173, The Wine Advocate

    The 2003 Barolo Monprivato is made in an atypically big, powerful style loaded with ripe fruit supported by plenty of structure. It boasts an enticing palate presence and a uniquely intense personality. The classic Monprivato notes of ripe cherries, roses, minerals, flowers and herbs are present, but they don’t have the clarity and precision of the finest vintages. In 2003 Mascarello was more severe than normal in his green harvesting of the vineyard as he wanted to lighten the load on his plants to reduce their stress. He was also helped considerably by the compact, moisture-retentive soils. Readers who prefer more classically-styled versions of Monprivato may want to revisit the 1999 and 2001 although Mascarello told me he prefers the 2003 to the 2001. Anticipated maturity: 2008-2023. Mauro Mascarello is one of the few producers who prefers his 2003 Barolos to his 2001s as he finds they have more power and intensity while also maintaining finesse and a sense of classicism. The wines certainly have more power, but I am not sure I would agree they have more finesse. In any event, his 2003 Barolos are among the best of the vintage, in particular the Santo Stefano di Perno and Monprivato. I also tasted the 2003 Ca’ d’ Morissio from barrel a few months ago, and it is shaping up to be a remarkably rich wine very much in keeping with the style of the vintage. Mascarello hasn’t decided when he will release the 2001 Ca’ d’ Morissio, but it, too, is promising, as is his entire range of 2004 Barolos.  

Tasting Notes
93
Italy 2001 Bibi Graetz Testamatta

2 Bottle 300cl £480
  • Rating 93

    Reviewed by Daniel Thomases

    Issue Date 26th Apr 2004

    Source 152, The Wine Advocate

    The 2001 Testamatta, a blend of Sangiovese, Canaiolo, and Colorino, is a very full and firm ruby, and its expansive nose of red currant and plum fruit, underbrush, Mediterranean herbs, and sweet oak, is matched by rich, round flavors of ripe red fruit, vanilla, and seared oak. Already quite approachable, it has the stuffing to last for another decade and a half. 

Tasting Notes
93
Italy 2011 Gaja Barolo Langhe Conteisa

1 Case 6 75cl £600
  • Rating

    94

    Release Price

    NA

    Drink Date

    2017 - 2035

    Reviewed by

    Monica Larner

    Issue Date

    29th Jun 2015

    Source

    219, The Wine Advocate

    The 2011 Langhe Nebbiolo Conteisa is an irresistible wine with enormous depth, beauty and penetration. It sweeps over the palate in opulent waves with dark fruit, spice, leather and grilled herbs. It also shows a distinct balsam personality with cola and dried violets that give the wine a beautiful sense of aromatic lift and buoyancy. Langhe Conteisa is made with Nebbiolo (and a tiny part Barbera) from the Cerequio vineyard in La Morra. The 2011 vintage is slightly broader than past vintages, but this wine promises a long drinking evolution regardless.

Tasting Notes
94
Italy 2009 Bartolo Mascarello Barolo

1 Case 6 150cl £2,000
  • Bartolo Mascarello fans will want to stock up on the 2009 Barolo, a great choice for indulging in pure pleasure while vintages like 2006, 2008 and 2010 take their time to develop in bottle. Dried rose petals, fennel, anise, sweet tobacco and mint are all very much alive in the glass. The 2009 is ethereal, graceful and utterly beguiling from the very first taste. I expect the 2009 will mature relatively quickly by the estate's standards, but there is more positive to that than negative.

     

Tasting Notes
94
Italy 1997 Fontodi Flaccianello della Pieve

2 Case 6 75cl £520
94
Italy 1978 Solaia

1 Bottle 75cl £275£250
  • At 35 years of age, the 1978 Solaia is still in great shape. Deep, rich and muscular, with great intensity for a wine of its age, the 1978 is an absolutely joy to taste. Over the years, the 1978 has acquired distinctly Sangiovese-inflected overtones, which is fascinating to contemplate.

    -- Antonio Galloni 94 Antonio Galloni 2013 - 2018 Not Available Dec 2013

Tasting Notes
94
Italy 1985 Solaia

1 Bottle 75cl £225£195
  • The 1985 Solaia kicks off a flight of Early Classics. I have had the 1985 twice recently and it has always been impressive. It is also very much a wine of its era, which is to say if anything, it is too polished. This was an era in which wines were squeaky-clean. Well-stored bottles still have plenty of fruit although further upside appears to be limited.

    -- Antonio Galloni94Antonio Galloni2013 - 2023Not AvailableDec 2013

     

Tasting Notes
94
Italy 2004 Tignanello

3 Case 6 75cl £550
94
Italy 2017 Sassicaia

[Due July 2020]

2 Case 6 75cl £845
  • Rating 94 Drink Date 2021 - 2040

    Reviewed by Monica Larner

    Issue Date 2nd Jan 2020

    Source January 2020 Week 1, The Wine Advocate

    The 2017 Sassicaia is a fascinating wine that symbolizes a never-ending tug-of-war between vintner and vintage. The question is who comes out on top? In this case, my money is on the vintner. The 2017 vintage, characterized by scorching heat and drought across much of Italy, was not an easy one. However, vintners had ample time to prepare because those climatic challenges had already played out midway through the summer season. Vintners with experience such as that amassed at Tenuta San Guido (now on the eve of Sassicaia's 50th birthday celebration) knew exactly how to handle the tricky 2017 growing season. Fruit was harvested early to avoid any jammy sensations, and a strict selection process was employed in order to preserve the best clusters. This Sassicaia represents 83% Cabernet Sauvignon and 17% Cabernet Franc, with most of the fruit coming from the Tenuta's historic vineyards Castiglioncello, Quercione and Doccino. These plots are all located on the back hill of Bolgheri at slightly higher elevations where they enjoy cooler nighttime temperatures. Old vines also have a deeper root system that is key to braving dry and hot summers. You can absolutely taste those choices here thanks to the wine's aromatic profile that offers more variety-driven green highlights of wild berry, forest floor and bramble than I would have expected. With time, as the wine takes on more air in the glass, you get a hint of summer plum or cherry cough drop, and this, to my surprise, is the only subtle reminder of the hot vintage encountered. I found the aromas here to be authentically "Tuscan" in character, more so than other vintages, with balsamic and Mediterranean elements that borrow directly from the Sangiovese playbook. I left the wine in my glass over the course of a day, checking back periodically, to find a growing mineral profile of rust or metal that recalls the high concentration of iron and manganese found in these Bolgheri soils. Another vintage-specific adjustment made in 2017 was shorter overall maceration times in steel tanks (from 10 to 12 days for the Cabernet Sauvignon and eight to 10 days for the Cabernet Franc). However, pump-overs and délestages were almost doubled in order to introduce more oxygen to the yeasts during fermentations at lower temperatures. Based on my understanding of fermentation kinetics, this means the 2017 Sassicaia would have achieved the same amount of extraction in about half the time. This process champions the cool-temperature fermentations that are a hallmark of Tenuta San Guido, despite the heat of the vintage. This puts more emphasis on aromatic elegance and minerality, rather than mouthfeel texture or creaminess per se. In fact, the 2017 Sassicaia is much shorter in the mid-palate compared to 2015 or 2016. In terms of oak, Tenuta San Guido takes advantage of the softer tannins found in Allier and Tronçais oak. The 2017 vintage saw a greater percentage (from 20% to 30%) of third and fourth passage barrique during the first 10 months of aging. The decision to use more neutral oak favors the reduction of oxygen and softens the tannic profile. Although the wine does end with a hint of bitterness, it took on noticeably more volume and soft richness the longer I kept my sample in the glass. To recap my assessment, and with the memory of the 100-point 2016 vintage so fresh in my mind, I would give this wine a seven out of 10 in terms of aromas, a five out of 10 in terms of mid-palate, and an eight out of 10 in terms of structure. Another way to read those conclusions is as follows: The 2017 Sassicaia was expertly built to withstand a long aging future, yet only time will tell if the beauty of the bouquet will evolve at the same pace. This fascinating wine magically captures the hallmarks of cool-temperature winemaking in one of the hottest vintages in recent years. Vintners, not vintage, won this round.

    This is a world preview of one of Italy’s most anticipated wines: Sassicaia. The 2017 vintage comes on the heels of the phenomenal 2016 vintage (which scored 100 points) and the beautifully exuberant 2015 vintage (which scored 97 points). The release of those back-to-back successes spurred an unprecedented Sassicaia buying spree that in turn drove growth for the entire market of fine Italian wines. The 2016 Sassicaia in particular has become a benchmark for a new generation of collectors. It is a symbol of the very happy chapter we are living in now on the extended timeline of vino italiano. The 2017 Sassicaia is a very different wine. Its character is more technical, inward-looking and inaccessible compared to the naturally exhilarating and effortless 2016 vintage. The 2017 vintage forces you to think about vintage challenges, winemaking variables and problem solving. The 2017 vintage was not easy and only the most experienced winemakers were able to navigate it successfully. Thanks to the significant know-how and foresight of its creators, the 2017 Sassicaia achieves all of its basic promises with success. However, 2017 will always be the vintage that comes after 2015 and 2016. Sassicaia Fast Facts: Tenuta San Guido covers 2,500 hectares of prime agricultural land near Bolgheri, on the Tuscan Coast. The estate counts 97 hectares of vines today. The first two hectares were planted in 1942, and following a few years of experimentation, the vineyard holdings grew substantially during the 1950s and 1960s to the current size. The first commercial vintage of Sassicaia is 1968. This historic Italian wine will celebrate its 50th anniversary in 2021, when the 2018 vintage is released. Sassicaia was not produced in 1969 or 1973. The name Sassicaia comes from the stones, or “sassi" in Italian, found in the historic vineyard. Today, the extended Sassicaia vineyards see soils with alluvial deposits, a mix of silt, clay, sand, gravel and a high concentration of iron and manganese. These give distinctly mineral traits to the wine that become more evident as it evolves. Some 207,000 bottles of the 2016 Sassicaia were made. In 2017, production volume was reduced by about 15%. This was due to strict fruit selection following a very hot and dry growing season. Harvest in 2017 came about nine days earlier compared to 2016, especially for the estate’s Merlot and Cabernet Franc. The Cabernet Sauvignon was picked one week earlier in 2017 compared to 2016. Despite a long and intricate family tree, here is a brief synopsis of three generations that own Tenuta San Guido: Marchese Mario Incisa della Rocchetta married Clarice della Gherardesca. They had three children: Orietta (married name Hunyady), Enrico and Nicolò Incisa della Rocchetta. Marchese Nicolò runs the estate today with a team of professional managers. He has one daughter, Priscilla. She has five cousins: Eleonora, Giovanni and Piero Incisa, and Stefano and Jozsef Hunyady. Mario Incisa della Rochetta created Sassicaia as a non-commercial “family wine.” Winemaker Giacomo Tachis started with the 1968 vintage and created the current blueprint for the wine. Today, Marchese Nicolò works with Tenuta San Guido General Director Carlo Paoli and the external winemaking consultant Graziana Grassini. Sassicaia is the only Italian wine that enjoys its own appellation, Bolgheri Sassicaia, founded in 1994. The appellation was initially a subzone of the Bolgheri DOC, but it became an independent DOC in January 2014. The precise blend of grapes used in the 2017 vintage is 83% Cabernet Sauvignon and 17% Cabernet Franc. The classic formula for Sassicaia is 85% Sauvignon to 15% Franc. Fermentation in 2017 was shorter, with macerations lasting from 10 to 12 days for the Cabernet Sauvignon and eight to 10 days for Cabernet Franc. Macerations at Tenuta San Guido always occur in stainless steel tanks, with controlled temperatures and frequent délestages and pump-overs, giving oxygen to the yeasts and softening the tannins. During its first years of production, Sassicaia was aged in Slavonian oak casks. Today, Sassicaia is aged in French barriques (mainly from the Allier and Tronçais forests, which are known for softer tannins) for about 24 months. The barrels see medium toast and long seasoning (lasting 22 to 36 months). Bottling for the 2017 Sassicaia will start in mid-January. The samples I tasted did not benefit from final racking efforts nor did they go through the traditional bottling line.

Tasting Notes
94
Italy 2011 Gaja Barolo Sperss

1 Case 6 75cl £750
  • Rating

    95

    Release Price

    NA

    Drink Date

    2018 - 2035

    Reviewed by

    Monica Larner

    Issue Date

    29th Jun 2015

    Source

    219, The Wine Advocate

    With fruit from Serralunga d'Alba, the 2011 Langhe Sperss is a wine of profound beauty. This is a velvety and caressing expression with dark fruit layers followed by kirsch, cassis, leather, balsam herb and white truffle. The Gaja family decided to move their bottling date forward in order to preserve the integrity and freshness of fruit in this warm vintage. This move has helped to avoid overripe sensations. In fact, Langhe Sperss seems fresh and tonic. This bodes exceptionally well for its aging potential.

Tasting Notes
95
Italy 2012 Le Pupille Saffredi

1 Case 6 75cl £360
  • 95

    The excellent 2012 Saffredi is one of the best wines I have tasted from Fattoria le Pupille. This is an exuberant and expressive blend of Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and a smaller part Petit Verdot from the gorgeous hills of Maremma near Grosseto, Tuscany. The wine is rich and penetrating with a stunning sense of balance and inner poise. Dark cherry, blackberry, spice, leather, tobacco and grilled herb flow freely from the bouquet. The wine is softly textured with full body appeal. This fabulous Saffredi should age forward ten years or more. The Cabernet component of the wine shows perfect ripeness. (Monica Larner)

Tasting Notes
95
Italy 2012 Brunello di Montalcino, Cerbaiona Molinari

1 Case 12 75cl £1,150
  • Cerbaiona's 2012 Brunello di Montalcino is a nuanced and delicate wine that offers ample power, intensity and length. What the wine does best is paint a portrait of the grape in its most pure and naked state. It offers crisp outlines with loads of wild berry, blue flower and moist earth on the inside. That balanced ensemble of flavors adds to the long and polished persistence you feel in the mouth. Give this wine another 10 years of aging to best appreciate its slow evolution and budding complexity.

    Score: 95Monica Larner, Wine Advocate (235), February 2018

Tasting Notes
95
Italy 2010 Gaja Barbaresco Sori Tildin

1 Bottle 300cl £1,150
  • 96+

    Release Price

    NA

    Drink Date

    2018 - 2040

    Reviewed by

    Monica Larner

    Issue Date

    28th Jun 2013

    Source

    207, The Wine Advocate

    Gaia Gaja uses the word “salty” to describe this next wine, and I see her point. The 2010 Sori Tildin shows a dry, firmly structured quality that enhances those extraordinary, breezy overtones of lead pencil and brimstone that so fittingly frame the Nebbiolo grape. The lingering end-notes of rose petal, ginger and cedar are striking. You immediately feel the tannic structure and power of the wine. The jump is very sharp next to the Costa Russi, and that’s why this is one of Gaja’s best cellar-agers. Anticipated maturity: 2018-2040.  

Tasting Notes
96
Italy 2006 Fontodi Flaccianello della Pieve

[Duty Paid]

1 Case 12 75cl £1,075
96
Italy 2013 Tignanello

[lying Crown Cellars Hong Kong]

2 Bottle 150cl £120
  • 228, The Wine Advocate

    The 2013 Tignanello represents the beginning of a new chapter for Italy's ultimate game-changer wine. The blend remains 80% Sangiovese with 15% Cabernet Sauvignon and 5% Cabernet Franc but Renzo Cotarella tells me "stylistically-speaking, this is what we wanted to achieve." The winemaking formula remains the same, but one of the major differences and benefits to this wine is vineyard age. The celebrated Tignanello single vineyard is now reaching 15 years old. In other words, it is in its production prime. This is a harmonious and beautifully integrated wine that reveals black fruit and baking spice. I'm told the 2014 Tignanello will have a greater percentage of Cabernet Sauvignon and the 2015 vintage will have more Sangiovese.

Tasting Notes
96
Italy 2012 Isole e Olena Cepparello

2 Bottle 300cl £250
  • The 2012 Cepparello is just as compelling as it has always been. Sweet, ample and generous from the outset, the 2012 shows all of its pedigree, even at this early stage. Radiant fruit and exquisite aromatics make a strong opening statement as the wine fleshes out in the glass. Ample, creamy and super-expressive, the 2012 is shaping up to be a superb Cepparello. The only thing the 2012 needs is time. An up and down year with hot temperatures in July and early August, followed by rain in September forced DeMarchi to be especially selective and bottle only the best lots. Production is down to 30,000 bottles from 36,000 in 2013 and 32,400 in 2011.

Tasting Notes
97

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