Wine List

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Region Producer Vintage Name Qty Unit Case Format Price Note Ratingsort ascending
Rhone Guigal 2010 Hermitage ex Voto -

2 Case 6 75cl £1,150
  • At the risk of sounding like a broken record, the 2010 Hermitage Ex Voto is as good as it gets. Following some of the most concentrated, rich Cote Roties ever made, it still ratcheted up the concentration level with its massive, palate saturating levels of gamey dark fruits, cassis, licorice, chocolate, graphite and powdered rock. It this beauty doesn’t make fireworks go off in your head, I don’t know what will. Full-bodied, deeply concentrated and structured, yet also fine, elegant and delineated, it is nothing short of incredible. Give this awesome Hermitage 5-6 years in the cellar and feel free to drink it anytime over the following 4-5 decades

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Chapoutier 2005 Ermitage Le Pavillon

[lying Crown Cellars Hong Kong]

5 Case 6 75cl £890
  • JEB DUNNUCK: 100

     

    ROBERT PARKER: 98

    My favorite of the 2005s from Chapoutier, the 2005 Ermitage Le Pavillon is a heavenly wine that comes from one of the greatest sites for Syrah in the world, the steep, granite-dominated hillside of les Bessards. Getting a bevy of expletives in my notes, this insanely good Hermitage offers classic notes of smoked meats, charcoal, liquid rock, burning embers, chocolate and cassis, as well as a thick, unctuous and massively concentrated style on the palate. Changing in the glass, with exotic aromatics, incredible purity and building, polished tannin, Syrah doesn’t get any better. Given the youthful profile here, I’m sure this.

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Pegau 2007 CNDP Cuvee da Capo

1 Bottle 300cl £1,500
  • For the fourth time, the Chateauneuf du Pape Cuvee da Capo has been produced, and for the fourth time, it has received a perfect score although I might back off the 2000's perfect score based on the fact that it seems to be more of an upper-ninety point wine than pure perfection these days. The 2007 may come closest in style to the 1998, the debut vintage, although the tannins are sweeter and the wine is perhaps fatter and richer in the mouth. The alcohols in these cuvees can be very high, ranging from 16.1% in 2003, 15.8% in 2000, 16.3% in 1998, to 15.5% (the lowest ever) in 2007. An inky/purple color is followed by aromas of smoked meats, Peking duck, licorice, lavender, aged beef, grilled steak blood, black currants, plums, sauteed cepes and soy. Enormously concentrated, broad, expansive and massive but not over the top, this is a tour de force in winemaking that is impossible to imagine unless one has a bottle to work through over the course of 4 to 5 hours. Although they advertise using all 13 authorized varietals, this wine is over 90% Grenache, largely from the famed La Crau section of Chateauneuf du Pape. They do have other vineyards from which they pull some of the fruit that goes into the Cuvee da Capo, including St.-Jean, Esquilons and occasionally Monpertuis. The 2007 seems to be broader, fatter, more unctuously textured and more flattering to drink at this stage than the 1998 was. In that sense, the evolutionary development may resemble their 2003s. The 2007 was bottled in February, 2010, and my anticipated drinking dates are 2014-2030+.

    Score: 100

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Clos Saint-Jean 2007 Chateauneuf Combe Des Fous

owc

1 Case 6 75cl £1,500
  • The 2007 Chateauneuf du Pape La Combe des Fous (meaning "Valley of the Fools"), which comes from a specific vineyard known as Les Combes, was cropped at extremely low yields of 20-25 hectoliters per hectare. Atypically for a Chateauneuf du Pape, it contains a high percentage of Vaccarese (10%), along with 60% Grenache, 20% Syrah, and 10% Cinsault. The Grenache was aged in tank, and the other varietals spent time in old small barrels or demi-muids. Explosive aromatics include spring flowers, boysenberries, blueberries, black raspberries, graphite, and charcoal. A powerful wine with great depth, full body, and an endless finish, it is exquisitely pure with not a rough edge to be found. It is the equivalent of liquid haute couture. The Musigny of the southern Rhone, it possesses extraordinary aromatics followed by a wine with the texture, length, and multilayered mouthfeel that are the stuff of dreams. Looking back at my tasting notes, the first thing I wrote was "whoa!" Deep plum/purple to the rim, this wine should evolve for 20-25 years, but it is already remarkably accessible. The vintage's freshness as evidenced by the lack of any excessive heat and cool nights has given an aromatic singularity to the 2007s that is largely unprecedented in my tasting experience.

    Score: 100
     

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Chapoutier 2009 Ermitage Le Meal

2 Case 3 150cl £1,125
  • Even inkier in color than the 2010, the 2009 Ermitage le Meal is as good as Hermitage gets. Locked and loaded with phenomenal notes of jammy black raspberries, creme de cassis, crushed violets, smoked earth and spice, it's thick and unctuous on the palate, with incredible density, a huge mid-palate and a layered, multi-dimensional, seamless, elegant texture that just keeps you coming back and begging for another sip. More hedonistic and voluptuous than the 2010, it should still evolve for just as long, yet have even a broader drink window.

    Score: 100 Jeb Dunnuck, Wine Advocate, September 2015

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Chapoutier 2012 Ermitage l'Ermite

1 Case 6 75cl £1,200
  • Another wine that topped out on my scale, the 523-case 2012 Ermitage l'Ermite is as profound an Hermitage as you can find. Coming from the granite soils located around the Chapel on the top of Hermitage hill, it's always the most tight, backward and structured of the releases, even more so than the Pavillon, which always seems to have another layer of sweet fruit to me. The 2012 is deeper and richer than the 2011, yet as with most 2012s, it more approachable and forward than the 2010 (and 2009 in this case). Exhibiting awesome notes of powdered rock, creme de cassis, liquid violets and lite gunpowder, it hits the palate with full-bodied richness, awesome mid-palate depth and building, ultra-fine tannin that frame the finish. It's an incredible wine that will won't start to become approachable until a decade after the vintage, and then will keep for three decades.

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Chapoutier 2012 Ermitage l'Ermite Blanc

1 Case 6 75cl £1,200
  • Rating

    100

    Release Price

    NA

    Drink Date

    2014 - 2042

    Reviewed by

    Jeb Dunnuck

    Issue Date

    30th Dec 2014

    Source

    216, The Wine Advocate

    White wine simply doesn't get any better than the 2012 Ermitage l'Ermite Blanc. A massive, concentrated, yet insanely pure and focused effort, it has an incredible bouquet (almond paste, orange rind, caramelized peach), full-bodied richness, no hard edges and finish that just won't quit. Of all the 2012 whites, this has the most minerality, purity and precision. I'd happily drink it anytime over the coming 3-4 decades.

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Jaboulet-Aine 2015 Hermitage La Chapelle

[US Slip Labels]

1 Case 6 75cl £900
  • Lastly, and a legendary wine in the making, the 2015 Hermitage La Chapelle is reminiscent of the 1990 with its full-bodied, opulently, sexy, yet concentrated style. Offering sensational notes of blackcurrants, smoked herbs, beef blood, and chocolate, it’s a huge yet elegant wine that has masses of sweet tannin, incredible purity and finesse, and a killer finish. It’s the finest wine from this estate in close to 30 years. Hats off to Caroline Fray and Jacques Desvernois!

    Score: 100 Jeb Dunnuck, JebDunnuck.com, January 2018

    Bright purple. Explosive, smoke- and spice-accented blueberry, cherry cola, incense and smoky mineral aromas show outstanding delineation and pick up a hint of olive with aeration. Sweet and expansive on the palate, offering deeply concentrated dark berry liqueur, fruitcake and floral pastille flavors, along with a suggestion of star anise. The remarkably long, penetrating finish features strong minerally cut, an echo of sweet blue fruit and harmonious tannins that come in late and fold effortlessly into the deeply concentrated fruit. At this stage, this is a contender for the wine of the vintage, at least by estimation.

    Score: 98 Josh Raynolds, vinous.com, April 2018

    The 2015 Hermitage La Chapelle is one of the estate’s finest recent efforts. It’s packed with firm tannins and will need to be lost in the cellar for a decade, but it will reward those with patience. Richly concentrated and full-bodied, it hits all the expected notes—cassis, black olive, smoke, crushed stone, pencil shavings and espresso—then finishes long, with an aristocratic sense of reserve and austerity. Winemaker Jacques Devernois compares it to a woman’s black dress, meaning it speaks of elegance and class.

    Score: 98 Joe Czerwinski, Wine Advocate (234), December 2017

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Pegau 2010 CNDP Cuvee da Capo

[US Slip Labels]

2 Bottle 150cl £750
  • Comprised of roughly 85% Grenache and the rest Syrah and other permitted varieties, aged all in foudre, the 2010 Chateauneuf du Pape Cuvee da Capo is sheer perfection in a glass. Wine doesn’t get any better. Incredibly rich and concentrated, yet ethereal and even graceful, it boasts off-the-hook aromas of blackberry, licorice, spice-box, smoked meats and underbrush that continue to change and develop in the glass. Massive and decadent on the palate, yet again, with no weight and a seamless texture, this brilliant effort needs a handful of years in the cellar and will live to see its 30th birthday in fine form. Drink 2016-2040.

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Chapoutier 2013 Ermitage de l'Oree

[US Slip Label]

1 Bottle 150cl £200
  • JEB DUNNUCK: 100

    Leading off three single-vintage whites from Hermitage, the stunning 2013 Ermitage Cuvee de L’Oree has an off-the-hook bouquet that includes just about everything you could think of when considering Hermitage Blanc. White peach, white flowers, almond paste, quince and wet rock are just some of the nuances, and it packs a serious punch on the palate, with full-bodied richness, a flamboyant, expansive texture and riveting focus and purity. Give it a year or so and drink it over the following 2-3 decades. Dec 2014, www.robertparker.com

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Chapoutier 2013 Ermitage Le Meal Blanc

[US Slip Labels]

1 Bottle 150cl £250
  • Rating

    100

    Release Price

    NA

    Drink Date

    2015 - 2043

    Reviewed by

    Jeb Dunnuck

    Issue Date

    30th Dec 2014

    Source

    216, The Wine Advocate

    Easily the finest vintage of this cuvee to date, the 2013 Ermitage le Meal Blanc doesn’t give an inch to the more heralded Cuvee de L’Orée or l’Ermite. Pure perfection in a glass, with awesome caramelized citrus, pineapple, crushed rock, toasted bread and buttered peach, it’s full-bodied, massive and concentrated on the palate, with incredible purity, richness and length. As with the other top whites here, it needs a year or two in the cellar and will have 2-3 decades of longevity.

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Guigal 1990 Cote Rotie La Landonne

[Duty Paid]

4 Bottle 75cl £575
  • The 1990 La Landonne is a perfect wine! Fortunately, more than 800 cases were produced. It possesses an opaque black color, and a huge, truffle, licorice, cassis, and peppery-scented nose. While it is one of the most concentrated wines I have ever poured across my palate, it is perfectly balanced, with adequate underlying acidity, huge extraction of ripe fruit and tannin, and a phenomenal 70-second or longer finish. This is the essence of Syrah! Give this monumental wine 7-10 years of cellaring; it will last for 40-45 + years. 

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Chapoutier 2010 Ermitage L'Ermite

2 Case 6 75cl £1,350
100
Rhone Clos Saint-Jean 2007 Chateauneuf du Pape Deus Ex Machina

1 Case 12 75cl £3,400
100
Rhone Clos Saint-Jean 2007 Chateauneuf du Pape la Combe des Fous

1 Case 12 75cl £3,400
100
Rhone Guigal 1998 Cote Rotie La Landonne

[Duty Paid]

1 Case 6 75cl £1,800
100
Rhone Guigal 1998 Cote Rotie La Landonne

[Duty Paid]

3 Bottle 75cl £300
100
Rhone Janasse 2007 Chateauneuf du Pape Vieilles Vignes

[Duty Paid]

1 Case 12 75cl £1,650
100
Rhone Janasse 2007 Chateauneuf du Pape XXL

4 Case 6 75cl £1,900
100
Rhone Pegau 2010 Chateauneuf du Pape Cuvee da Capo

4 Case 6 75cl £2,200
100
Rhone Chapoutier 2010 Ermitage de l'Oree

5 Bottle 150cl £300
  • There are 716 cases of the 2010 Ermitage de l’Oree. I have been following this cuvee since its debut vintage and this 100% Marsanne possesses more richness than most Burgundy Montrachets. Although aged in 100% new, 500-liter demi-muids, the wine reveals no evidence of oak. Honeysuckle, caramelized citrus, white peach, quince and white currant characteristics are viscous and full-bodied, yet the wine possesses striking precision and laser-like focus. This monumental effort is the most opulent and richest of all Chapoutier’s dry whites in 2010. 
     

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Clos du Caillou 2001 Chateauneuf du Pape La Reserve

1 Case 12 75cl £1,850
  • Rating

    100

    Release Price

    NA

    Drink Date

    NA

    Reviewed by

    Jeb Dunnuck

    Issue Date

    28th Aug 2014

    Source

    214, The Wine Advocate

    An off-the-charts effort that was one of my wines of the trip, the 2001 Chateauneuf du Pape Reserve Le Clos du Caillou is a spectacular effort that doesn’t put a foot wrong. Getting a bevy of incredible, spectacular, and a few other adjectives (i.e. expletives) in the notes, this rock-star-of-a-Chateauneuf boasts off-the-hook notes of blackcurrants, saddle leather, beef blood, pepper, spring flowers and licorice. Possessing full-bodied richness on the palate, with beautiful underlying structure and depth, this incredible effort represents the essence of this fabulous terroir, and is a thrilling drink that I wish every Rhone- lover could have the opportunity to taste. 

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Sabon, Roger 2007 CNDP Le Secret de Sabon

1 Case 6 150cl £3,250
  • The 2007 Chateauneuf du Pape Le Secret du Sabon is jaw-dropping good, and tops out on my scale. Crazily perfumed and complex, with layers of kirsch, crushed flowers, incense, beef blood and garrigue, it hits the palate with massive depth and richness, thrilling purity of fruit and a seamless texture that needs to be tasted to be believed. I'd happily drink bottles today, but given its mid-palate depth and no shortage of tannin that emerges on the finish, it will have no issues evolving through 2027.

    Score: 100 Jeb Dunnuck, Wine Advocate (214), August 2014

    More closed and restrained than normal is the 2007 Chateauneuf du Pape Le Secret des Sabon. The Sabon family has always been "secretive" about the blend used for this cuvee, but they do acknowledge that about 90% Grenache is combined with a field blend from vines over 100 years of age. Yields are microscopic, averaging 8-12 hectoliters per hectare, and the wine is aged one year in used 600-liter demi-muids. In the years it has been made (the first commercial vintage was 1998, although a small amount was made for the family in 1990, 1995, and 1996), this cuvee often borders on pure perfection (i.e., 1998 and 2001). The 2007 is too backward at this stage to go that far out on a limb, but it possesses a dense plum/purple color to the rim as well as an extraordinary perfume of cedarwood, tobacco leaf, creosote, licorice, black fruits, smoke, and a smell and taste of highly-charred meat with the essence of blood. This extraordinarily full-bodied, but forebodingly backward wine is more inaccessible than the 1998 or 2001 were at a similar stage of development, but it is an enormous, massively-endowed Chateauneuf du Pape that represents the concentrated blood of an old vineyard. The finish is virtually endless, lasting well past a minute. It will benefit from 3-4 years of bottle age, and should drink well for 25-35 years thereafter.

    Score: 97+ Robert Parker, Wine Advocate (185), October 2009

    Reminiscent of a hypothetical blend, stylistically speaking, of a 1990 and 1998, the opaque plum/purple 2007 Chateauneuf du Pape Le Secret des Sabon is off the charts. There are only 2,000 bottles of this limited cuvee, from a parcel of 100+ year old vines in the famed La Crau sector. Enormously powerful notes of grilled herbs, roasted meats, creme de cassis, blackberries, charcoal, and truffles emerge from this massive, super-concentrated 2007. A tour de force in winemaking, this is old vine intensity at its greatest and purest. Give it 5-6 years of bottle age, and drink it over the following three decades.Proprietor Jean-Jacques Sabon and the other younger family members are taking these wines to even greater quality heights than previously attained. The new vintages possess updated, more polished labels, but more importantly, the wines continue to go from what were very strong efforts in the past, to even deeper concentration, complexity, and depth. All four cuvees are now routinely outstanding, with the top two offerings, the Cuvee Prestige and the limited production Le Secret des Sabon, compelling Chateauneufs. As with many estates, the 2007s exhibit the vintage's succulent, juicy, incredibly pure fruit and tremendous freshness and vivacity, all packed into substantial, full-bodied wines with surprisingly high alcohols given their vibrancy. One might expect such greatness in 2007 in Chateauneuf du Pape, but the Sabons have also hit the heights in the excellent 2006 vintage.

    Score: 96/100 Robert Parker, Wine Advocate (179), October 2008

    Very silky, with a beautiful beam of kirsch running through notesof pepper, incense, black tea and melted licorice. The long, supplefinish has good latent grip, while maintaining its perfumy elegance.Drink now through 2020.

    Score: 93 James Molesworth (Wine Spectator), Wine Spectator, September 2009

    Please note that these tasting notes/scores are not intended to be exhaustive and in some cases they may not be the most recently published figures. However, we always do our best to add latest scores and reviews when these come to our attention. We advise customers who wish to purchase wines based simply on critical reviews to carry out further research into the latest reports.

     

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Barroche 2010 Chateauneuf du Pape Pure

1 Case 6 75cl £1,110
  • Rating

    100

    Drink Date

    2015 - 2030

    Reviewed by

    Jeb Dunnuck

    Issue Date

    14th Sep 2015

    Source

    Special Report (Sep 2015), The Wine Advocate

    A wine that will rival the '05 in another handful of years, the utterly profound 2010 Chateauneuf du Pape Pure offers the most purity and precision of any of the cuvees, yet backs it up with incredible concentration and depth. Giving up tons of blackberry, kirsch, black cherries, pepper, ground herbs and licorice, it's impeccably balanced and manages somehow to deliver an insane amount of fruit and texture in a lively, graceful and elegant style. Grenache at its finest, give bottles 2-3 years and count yourself lucky anytime you're able to drink this elixir. It should have 20-25 years of longevity.

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Chapoutier 2010 Ermitage Vin de Paille

1 Case 3 37.5cl £335
  • Because of a change in French laws, the 2010 Ermitage Vin de Paille will be the last sweet wine made by Chapoutier. Made from 100% Marsanne, this perfect wine exhibits an incredible perfume of truffles, apricot jam and caramelized tangerines. This noble, surgically precise classic can be drunk now or cellared for over 100 years. It is a remarkable wine, and it’s a shame to see this cuvee discontinued. For the technical minded, this wine has 120 grams of residual sugar. 

    In November of this year, Michel Chapoutier finally made the cover of The Wine Spectator. The accompanying article said essentially the same things I had written about over twenty years ago. More importantly, I am thrilled that Chapoutier received this attention because it has long been deserved. History will record that Michel Chapoutier is a revolutionary. He is also a highly emotional man whose infectious love of primitive art, historic books, classical music and, of course, terroir and winemaking are seemingly impossible to harness. Michel Chapoutier was among the first in France to embrace the radical biodynamic agricultural teachings, for which he was initially criticized, but is now praised. He was also the first to print all his labels in Braille, something that cynics considered to be a gimmick, but ask the National Association for the Blind what they think. Coming from a famous family, but moving in a direction unlike any of its previous members, Michel Chapoutier is self-taught. What he has accomplished over the last two decades or more is one of the great wine stories of the modern era. With all his outgoing, boisterous, machine-gun-speed prose that can sometimes sound shockingly cocky, and at other times reminiscent of the famous Lebanese poet Khalil Gibran, there is never a dull moment around Chapoutier., who makes comments such as “Filtering wine is like making love with a condom,” and “Acidifying wine is like putting a suit of armor on the vineyard’s terroir, vintage character and the cepage.” Don’t blame him if his brilliant intellect and shocking vocabulary put his visitors on the defensive. Michel Chapoutier has proven through his genius, the faith of his convictions and backbreaking attention to detail in his vineyards and in the winery that a once moribund negociant (yet with significant vineyard holdings) could become a beacon of inspiration and quality for the entire world. In short, every wine consumer in the world should admire his accomplishments. All of Chapoutier’s lower level 2010 whites and basic reds have long been sold out, so to keep the tasting somewhat limited during my visit, we focused on the more recently released 2010 white and red selections parcellaires and nearly all the 2011s. As for the 2010 selection parcellaire whites, they are spectacular. Le Pavillon, once called Rochefine and owned by Jaboulet-Verchere, consists of 10 acres of pure granite in the famed Les Bessards, which is considered by many to be the single greatest terroir of Hermitage. The Ermitage Le Pavillon, which is meant to age for 50+ years, is Michel Chapoutier’s legacy, and he is confident that history will support his belief in this extraordinary wine. Michel Chapoutier is not alone in believing the 2011s may resemble a more modern day version of 1991. That vintage was largely underrated by just about everybody (except yours truly) because all the accolades and hyperbole were largely bestowed on both 1989 and 1990 (deservedly), but in the Northern Rhone 1991 turned out to be a strikingly superb vintage for Cote Rotie, Hermitage, Cornas and Condrieu. In the Southern Rhone, the vintage was largely a disaster. Following is an overview of what to expect with the inexpensive 2011 whites and reds. Most of these wines do not have the weight, power or tannic structure of the 2010s, but they are by no means diluted or wimpish wines. They tend to be charming, fruit-forward and seductive, and thus may be preferred by consumers looking for immediate gratification. Although the first few wines reviewed are Southern Rhones, they need to be covered because they are in bottle, and I did not review them in issue 203. Along with several other producers, Michel Chapoutier has helped increase the world’s attention to the long-forgotten, microscopic appellation of St.-Peray. Chapoutier produces a bevy of St.-Perays under his own name as well as in partnership with two three-star chefs, Sophie Pic, of the Restaurant Pic in Valence (as well as several culinary branches in Paris and Lausanne, Switzerland), and Yannick Alleno, the brilliant chef at the Hotel Le Meurice’s in Paris. I did not review the two rose offerings from the Southern Rhone in issue 203, but both are excellent. Rose drinking season in the Mid-Atlantic and northeast regions is largely shut down until warm weather returns next spring. People in other, warmer climates of our country can still enjoy these wines. The red 2011 selections parcellaires are already fruit-forward and seductive. Readers should love them as they are much more evolved than the more structured, powerful, dense, tannic 2010s.

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Grand Veneur 2010 Chateauneuf du Pape Vieilles Vignes

1 Case 6 150cl £1,450
  • Rating

    100

    Release Price

    $75 - 90

    Drink Date

    2017 - 2047

    Reviewed by

     Robert M. Parker, Jr.

    Issue Date

    31st Oct 2012

    Source

    203, The Wine Advocate

    A monumental effort meriting a perfect score, the super-rich 2010 Chateauneuf du Pape Vieilles Vignes is a 4,000-bottle blend of 50% Grenache, 40% Mourvedre and 10% Syrah from 55- to 105-year-old vines and was aged for 18 months in small oak. The wine offers majestic blackberry and cassis fruit intermixed with kirsch, licorice and subtle Provencal herbs in the background. It is akin to chewing meat in the mouth given its viscosity and thickness. This utterly amazing wine comes close to being over the top, but it pulls back just in time. A massive Chateauneuf du Pape (even for a 2010), it needs 5-6 years of cellaring and should age effortlessly for 25-30 years. Bravo!  

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Janasse 2010 Chateauneuf du Pape Vieilles Vignes

2 Case 12 75cl £1,425
100
Rhone Chapoutier 2011 Ermitage Le Pavillon

2 Bottle 150cl £300
  • Rating

    100

    Release Price

    $175 - 275

    Drink Date

    2013 - 2043

    Reviewed by

    Jeb Dunnuck

    Issue Date

    30th Dec 2013

    Source

    210, The Wine Advocate

    Even better and a prodigious effort that hits all my sweet spots, the 2011 Ermitage Le Pavillon comes from one of the top terroirs on Hermitage hill, the granite soils of the Les Bessards lieu-dit. Spectacularly perfumed, with raspberry, blackberry, licorice, toasted spices and assorted floral nuances, this full-bodied effort has massive depth and richness, no hard edges and masses of finely polished tannin that emerge on and frame the finish. It will be approachable at an earlier age than either the 2009 or 2010, yet should nevertheless have 2-3 decades of ultimate longevity.  

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Jaboulet-Aine 1990 Hermitage La Chapelle

[Duty Paid]

2 Bottle 75cl £375
  • The 1990 La Chapelle is the sexy and opulent. I had the 1990 at the Jaboulet tasting, and again out of a double magnum three months ago. On both occasions it was spectacular, clearly meriting a three-digit score. The modern day equivalent of the 1961, it deserves all the attention it has garnered. The color remains an opaque purple, with only a slight pink at the edge. Spectacular aromatics offer up aromas of incense, smoke, blackberry fruit, cassis, barbecue spice, coffee, and a touch of chocolate. As it sits in the glass, additional nuances of pepper and grilled steak emerge. There is extraordinary freshness for such a mammoth wine in addition to abundant tannin, an amazing 60-second finish, and a level of glycerin and thick, fleshy texture that have to be tasted to be believed. Despite its youthfulness, the 1990 La Chapelle is lovely to drink, although it will be even better with another 5-6 years of cellaring; it should age for 35-40+ years. Anticipated maturity: 2005-2050

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Sabon, Roger 2001 CNDP Le Secret de Sabon

[Duty Paid]

4 Bottle 75cl £255
100
Rhone Usseglio, Pierre 2007 Chateauneuf du Pape Reserve des Deux Freres

1 Case 6 75cl £1,100
  • The perfect 2007 Chateauneuf du Pape Reserve des Deux Freres is slightly more evolved and complex than the Mon Aieul, as odd as that seems. Having had it twice out of bottle, this wine (nearly 100% Grenache combined with a few dollops of Syrah) possesses an opaque ruby/purple color as well as a thrilling texture and monumental length (the finish lasts over 60 seconds). It-s a blockbuster, but everything is in perfect balance, and, remarkably, it comes across as the most accessible Reserve des Deux Freres made to date. This wine-s aging is completely different from its sibling-s. Sixty percent is aged in 1, 2, and 3-year-old Burgundy barrels, and the rest in small new oak barrels, but there is not a hint of new oak in the aromatics. The bouquet reveals plenty of blackberry, blueberry, and cassis fruit intertwined with notions of melted licorice, spring flowers, and that classic garrigue note that comes across as the seaweed wrapper used in sushi restaurants, nori. There is a certain smokiness that is probably attributable to the oak, and the wine has incredible depth and richness, as well as a finish that seems endless. This extraordinary Chateauneuf du Pape is another prodigious effort in this historic vintage. It should drink well for two decades or more.

    Score: 100 Robert Parker, Wine Advocate (185), October 2009

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Sabon, Roger 1998 CNDP Le Secret de Sabon

[Duty Paid]

1 Bottle 75cl £250
  • Rating

    100

    Reviewed by

    Jeb Dunnuck

    Issue Date

    28th Aug 2014

    Source

    214, The Wine Advocate

    A rock-star 1999 that's drinking at point (like most wines in the vintage today), it should continue to evolve nicely going forward. Shockingly good, the 1998 Chateauneuf du Pape le Secret du Sabon tastes like a hypothetical blend of the 2007 and the 2001. Powerful, massive, concentrated and beautifully ripe, it offers notions of kirsch, currants, peppered meats, Asian spice and licorice in its seamless, yet voluptuous and hedonistic personality. It's a crazy good bottle of wine that could be considered over-the-top by some, but who cares when it's this good? If I had bottles, I'd line them up for drinking as you don't want to miss this beauty while it's drinking at point. A brilliantly run estate, Domaine Roger Sabon covers close to 44 acres that are spread throughout the appellation, and the wines have been made by Didier Negron since 2001. This retrospective focused on their top cuvee, the Secret du Sabon, which is a field blend of roughly (the exact blend is a "secret") 90% Grenache with the balance other permitted varieties (from 100-year-old vines), that-s aged all in 600-liter barrels. While the first released vintage was 1998, they also bottled a small amount in 1990, 1995 (the only one I've tasted? superb) and 1996. 

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Guigal 2009 Cote Rotie Trio Assortment - Mouline Turque Landonne -

2 Case 3 75cl £1,150£1,100
  • The 2009 Cote Rotie La Landonne is a killer wine. An extravagant bouquet of black truffles, roasted meats, licorice, ground pepper, blackberries, scorched earth and camphor soars from this muscular, dense, over-the-top, serious, masculine La Landonne. Built like Arnold Schwarzenegger was two decades ago, this enormously concentrated bodybuilder of a wine should hit its prime in a decade, and last 40-50 years. This is no trivial boast as the debut vintage of La Landonne, the 1978, is just reaching full maturity at age 34. The 2009 Cote Rotie La Mouline possesses off-the-charts richness. Like all the vintages, it comes from the Cote Blonde and is co-fermented with 11% Viognier. Its 13.5% alcohol is one of the highest in all the La Moulines made to date, which shows you that these wines are never that powerful. Extraordinary layers of concentration offer up notes of roasted coffee, sweet black cherries, black raspberries, blackberries, licorice and hints of spring flowers as well as lychee nuts (no doubt attributable to the floral/honeysuckle character of Viognier). With its full-bodied, extravagant richness, the 2009 La Mouline should be relatively approachable in 1-2 years, and last for two decades or more. Another perfect wine is the 2009 Cote Rotie La Turque. It possesses a slightly denser purple color than the opaque Cote Rotie La Mouline as well as notes of Asian spices, roasted meats, bouquet garni, spring flowers, camphor and truffles. It is a different expression of Syrah as this comes from the more iron-laden soils of the Cote Brune. Although never as aromatic, precocious or enjoyable as La Mouline is in its youth, La Turque is, nevertheless, a remarkably concentrated, profound wine that is built like a skyscraper. It possesses a level of intensity and richness that must be tasted to be believed. Despite the flamboyant personality of the vintage, the 2009 will require 4-5 years of cellaring and should age effortlessly for 25-30 years.

    Score: 100

    Robert Parker, Wine Advocate 01 December 2012

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Guigal 1998 Cote Rotie La Landonne

[repack]

2 Case 6 75cl £1,800
  • The 1998 Cote Rotie La Landonne is a perfect wine ... at least for my palate. Its saturated black/purple color is accompanied by an extraordinary nose of smoke, incense, tapenade, creosote, blackberry, and currant aromas. It is densely packed with blackberry, truffle, chocolate, and leather-like flavors. The wine possesses high tannin, but perfect harmony, impeccable balance, and gorgeous integration of acidity, alcohol, and tannin. It is a tour de force in winemaking. Anticipated maturity: 2007-2025. 

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Chapoutier 2000 Ermitage l'Ermite

[lying Crown Cellars Hong Kong]

1 Case 6 75cl £950
  • ROBERT PARKER: 99

    I grossly underestimated the 2000 Ermitage l’Ermite from barrel. This wine, which emerges from largely pre-phylloxera vines planted on the dome of Hermitage, adjacent to the chapel that is perched there so photogenically, possesses extraordinary finesse and elegance. It reveals notes of liquid minerals intermixed with kirsch liqueur and blackberries. While it never possesses the power and breadth of flavor of Le Meal or Le Pavillon, l’Ermite appears to be a hypothetical blend of Bordeaux’s Lafleur and Ausone as it always displays a certain austerity early in life. The extraordinary 2000 flirts with perfection.

Tasting Notes
99

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