Rhone

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Region Producer Vintage Name Qty Unit Case Size Format Price Note Rating
Rhone Barroche 2010 Chateauneuf du Pape Pure 1 Case 6 75cl £1,110
  • Rating

    100

    Drink Date

    2015 - 2030

    Reviewed by

    Jeb Dunnuck

    Issue Date

    14th Sep 2015

    Source

    Special Report (Sep 2015), The Wine Advocate

    A wine that will rival the '05 in another handful of years, the utterly profound 2010 Chateauneuf du Pape Pure offers the most purity and precision of any of the cuvees, yet backs it up with incredible concentration and depth. Giving up tons of blackberry, kirsch, black cherries, pepper, ground herbs and licorice, it's impeccably balanced and manages somehow to deliver an insane amount of fruit and texture in a lively, graceful and elegant style. Grenache at its finest, give bottles 2-3 years and count yourself lucky anytime you're able to drink this elixir. It should have 20-25 years of longevity.

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Beaucastel 2010 CNDP Hommage Jacques Perrin 4 Case 3 75cl £700
98
Rhone Bonneau Henri 2010 Chateauneuf du Pape 1 Case 6 75cl £850
Rhone Chapoutier 2010 Ermitage de l'Oree 5 Bottle 150cl £300
  • There are 716 cases of the 2010 Ermitage de l’Oree. I have been following this cuvee since its debut vintage and this 100% Marsanne possesses more richness than most Burgundy Montrachets. Although aged in 100% new, 500-liter demi-muids, the wine reveals no evidence of oak. Honeysuckle, caramelized citrus, white peach, quince and white currant characteristics are viscous and full-bodied, yet the wine possesses striking precision and laser-like focus. This monumental effort is the most opulent and richest of all Chapoutier’s dry whites in 2010. 
     

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Chapoutier 2010 Ermitage Vin de Paille 1 Case 3 37.5cl £335
  • Because of a change in French laws, the 2010 Ermitage Vin de Paille will be the last sweet wine made by Chapoutier. Made from 100% Marsanne, this perfect wine exhibits an incredible perfume of truffles, apricot jam and caramelized tangerines. This noble, surgically precise classic can be drunk now or cellared for over 100 years. It is a remarkable wine, and it’s a shame to see this cuvee discontinued. For the technical minded, this wine has 120 grams of residual sugar. 

    In November of this year, Michel Chapoutier finally made the cover of The Wine Spectator. The accompanying article said essentially the same things I had written about over twenty years ago. More importantly, I am thrilled that Chapoutier received this attention because it has long been deserved. History will record that Michel Chapoutier is a revolutionary. He is also a highly emotional man whose infectious love of primitive art, historic books, classical music and, of course, terroir and winemaking are seemingly impossible to harness. Michel Chapoutier was among the first in France to embrace the radical biodynamic agricultural teachings, for which he was initially criticized, but is now praised. He was also the first to print all his labels in Braille, something that cynics considered to be a gimmick, but ask the National Association for the Blind what they think. Coming from a famous family, but moving in a direction unlike any of its previous members, Michel Chapoutier is self-taught. What he has accomplished over the last two decades or more is one of the great wine stories of the modern era. With all his outgoing, boisterous, machine-gun-speed prose that can sometimes sound shockingly cocky, and at other times reminiscent of the famous Lebanese poet Khalil Gibran, there is never a dull moment around Chapoutier., who makes comments such as “Filtering wine is like making love with a condom,” and “Acidifying wine is like putting a suit of armor on the vineyard’s terroir, vintage character and the cepage.” Don’t blame him if his brilliant intellect and shocking vocabulary put his visitors on the defensive. Michel Chapoutier has proven through his genius, the faith of his convictions and backbreaking attention to detail in his vineyards and in the winery that a once moribund negociant (yet with significant vineyard holdings) could become a beacon of inspiration and quality for the entire world. In short, every wine consumer in the world should admire his accomplishments. All of Chapoutier’s lower level 2010 whites and basic reds have long been sold out, so to keep the tasting somewhat limited during my visit, we focused on the more recently released 2010 white and red selections parcellaires and nearly all the 2011s. As for the 2010 selection parcellaire whites, they are spectacular. Le Pavillon, once called Rochefine and owned by Jaboulet-Verchere, consists of 10 acres of pure granite in the famed Les Bessards, which is considered by many to be the single greatest terroir of Hermitage. The Ermitage Le Pavillon, which is meant to age for 50+ years, is Michel Chapoutier’s legacy, and he is confident that history will support his belief in this extraordinary wine. Michel Chapoutier is not alone in believing the 2011s may resemble a more modern day version of 1991. That vintage was largely underrated by just about everybody (except yours truly) because all the accolades and hyperbole were largely bestowed on both 1989 and 1990 (deservedly), but in the Northern Rhone 1991 turned out to be a strikingly superb vintage for Cote Rotie, Hermitage, Cornas and Condrieu. In the Southern Rhone, the vintage was largely a disaster. Following is an overview of what to expect with the inexpensive 2011 whites and reds. Most of these wines do not have the weight, power or tannic structure of the 2010s, but they are by no means diluted or wimpish wines. They tend to be charming, fruit-forward and seductive, and thus may be preferred by consumers looking for immediate gratification. Although the first few wines reviewed are Southern Rhones, they need to be covered because they are in bottle, and I did not review them in issue 203. Along with several other producers, Michel Chapoutier has helped increase the world’s attention to the long-forgotten, microscopic appellation of St.-Peray. Chapoutier produces a bevy of St.-Perays under his own name as well as in partnership with two three-star chefs, Sophie Pic, of the Restaurant Pic in Valence (as well as several culinary branches in Paris and Lausanne, Switzerland), and Yannick Alleno, the brilliant chef at the Hotel Le Meurice’s in Paris. I did not review the two rose offerings from the Southern Rhone in issue 203, but both are excellent. Rose drinking season in the Mid-Atlantic and northeast regions is largely shut down until warm weather returns next spring. People in other, warmer climates of our country can still enjoy these wines. The red 2011 selections parcellaires are already fruit-forward and seductive. Readers should love them as they are much more evolved than the more structured, powerful, dense, tannic 2010s.

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Chapoutier 2010 Ermitage L'Ermite 2 Case 6 75cl £1,350
100
Rhone Clos du Mont Olivet 2010 CNDP Mont Olivet Cuvee Papet 5 Case 12 75cl £820
  • ROBERT PARKER

    Possibly the finest example of the Chateauneuf du Pape Cuvee du Papet since Mont Olivet’s unreal 1990, the 2010 is a blend of 75% Grenache, 15% Mourvedre and 10% Syrah, all aged in foudre. The grapes come from the estate’s oldest vines (50- to 105-years-old), which were planted in the famous sites of Mont Olivet and Bois Dauphin. A extraordinarily deep plum/purple color is followed by notes of balsam wood, raspberries, black currants, lavender, garrigue, kirsch, licorice and underbrush. This quintessential Chateauneuf du Pape smells like an open-air Provencal market. It is a full-bodied, full-throttle, multilayered wine with exceptional concentration, power and precision. While it can be approached now, it will not hit its prime for another 3-4 years, and should last for two decades given how well the 1990 continues to perform. ||One of the first properties to estate bottle their wines (over 80 years ago), Clos du Mont Olivet is owned by a branch of the Sabon family, a name that is well-known throughout the village of Chateauneuf du Pape.||Various American importers including Michael Skurnik, Syosset, NY; tel. (516) 677-9300; David Hinkle, North Berkeley Imports, Berkeley, CA; tel. (510) 848-8910; Dionysus Imports, Manassas, VA; tel. (703) 392-7073; Ideal Wines and Spirits, Medford, MA; tel. (617) 395-3300; The Wine Company, St. Paul, MN; tel. (651) 487-1212; and Import Wines, Middleton, WI; tel. (608) 833-8622 Wine Advocate.October, 2012

Tasting Notes
99
Rhone Grand Veneur 2010 Chateauneuf du Pape Vieilles Vignes 1 Case 6 150cl £1,850
  • Rating

    100

    Release Price

    $75 - 90

    Drink Date

    2017 - 2047

    Reviewed by

     Robert M. Parker, Jr.

    Issue Date

    31st Oct 2012

    Source

    203, The Wine Advocate

    A monumental effort meriting a perfect score, the super-rich 2010 Chateauneuf du Pape Vieilles Vignes is a 4,000-bottle blend of 50% Grenache, 40% Mourvedre and 10% Syrah from 55- to 105-year-old vines and was aged for 18 months in small oak. The wine offers majestic blackberry and cassis fruit intermixed with kirsch, licorice and subtle Provencal herbs in the background. It is akin to chewing meat in the mouth given its viscosity and thickness. This utterly amazing wine comes close to being over the top, but it pulls back just in time. A massive Chateauneuf du Pape (even for a 2010), it needs 5-6 years of cellaring and should age effortlessly for 25-30 years. Bravo!  

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Guigal 2010 Hermitage ex Voto - 2 Case 6 75cl £1,150
  • At the risk of sounding like a broken record, the 2010 Hermitage Ex Voto is as good as it gets. Following some of the most concentrated, rich Cote Roties ever made, it still ratcheted up the concentration level with its massive, palate saturating levels of gamey dark fruits, cassis, licorice, chocolate, graphite and powdered rock. It this beauty doesn’t make fireworks go off in your head, I don’t know what will. Full-bodied, deeply concentrated and structured, yet also fine, elegant and delineated, it is nothing short of incredible. Give this awesome Hermitage 5-6 years in the cellar and feel free to drink it anytime over the following 4-5 decades

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Janasse 2010 Chateauneuf du Pape Vieilles Vignes 2 Case 12 75cl £1,425
100
Rhone Mas de Boislauzon 2010 Chateauneuf-du-Pape Cuvee Quet 2 Bottle 150cl £390
  • 93 points

    75% grenache and 25% mourvedre): Glass-staining purple. Heady, spice-accented aromas of dark fruit liqueur, cola, licorice and candied violet. Broad-shouldered and deeply concentrated, offering sweet cassis and blueberry flavors that show a distinctly ripe character. Tannins build with air and carry through an impressively long, smoky finish that strongly echoes the blueberry and licorice notes. This masculine, brawny wine has shaped up very nicely since last year but it will never impress with finesse.

    -- Josh Raynolds

     

     

Tasting Notes
93
Rhone Mordoree 2010 Chateauneuf du Pape La Reine des Bois 2 Case 6 75cl £480
  • Rating

    99+

    Release Price

    NA

    Drink Date

    2016 - 2046

    Reviewed by

    Jeb Dunnuck

    Issue Date

    28th Aug 2014

    Source

    214, The Wine Advocate

    A wine that might rival the 2001 when all is said and done, the 2010 Chateauneuf du Pape Cuvee de La Reine des Bois is an incredible effort that does everything right. Possessing a voluptuous, decadent and super-rich profile, it stays graceful and perfectly balanced, with beautiful freshness, a stacked mid-palate and a blockbuster finish. Opening up in the glass, with copious blackberry, cassis, graphite, violets and spring flower-like nuances, it needs another 2-3 years of bottle age, and will have upward of three decades of overall longevity.   

Tasting Notes
99
Rhone Pegau 2010 CNDP Cuvee da Capo 2 Bottle 150cl £750
  • Comprised of roughly 85% Grenache and the rest Syrah and other permitted varieties, aged all in foudre, the 2010 Chateauneuf du Pape Cuvee da Capo is sheer perfection in a glass. Wine doesn’t get any better. Incredibly rich and concentrated, yet ethereal and even graceful, it boasts off-the-hook aromas of blackberry, licorice, spice-box, smoked meats and underbrush that continue to change and develop in the glass. Massive and decadent on the palate, yet again, with no weight and a seamless texture, this brilliant effort needs a handful of years in the cellar and will live to see its 30th birthday in fine form. Drink 2016-2040.

Tasting Notes
100
Rhone Pegau 2010 Chateauneuf du Pape Cuvee da Capo 4 Case 6 75cl £2,200
100
Rhone Usseglio, Pierre 2010 Chateauneuf du Pape 1 Case 12 75cl £375
  • OBERT PARKER: 93

    The 2010 Chateauneuf du Pape Tradition was cropped at 23 hectoliters per hectare (overall it was a small crop in 2010), and is a blend of mostly Grenache and 20% Syrah, with 80% aged in old wood foudres and 20% in small barrels. The alcohol level came in at 15.5%. Classic black raspberry, black cherry, garrigue, and lavender notes hit the palate with considerable authority. The Syrah component provides a slightly deeper purple hue to the color than is apparent in some other vintages. The extra level of concentration due to the tiny yields has resulted in a full-bodied, rich wine with super purity. It is already accessible, and should keep for 10-15 years. ||This branch of the Usseglio family left their home in Italy following the Great Depression in 1929 to make a new start producing wine in southern France. This estate has been on “fire” qualitatively since 1998. The cellars of brothers Jean-Pierre and Thierry Usseglio, who own approximately 60 acres of vines, are located adjacent to the ruins of a pope’s palace on the northeastern side of the village. In top vintages, such as 2010, 2009 and 2007, three Chateauneuf du Pape cuvees are produced. These include a traditional cuvee, the old vine, tank- and foudre-aged Mon Aieul and the more modern-styled Reserve des Deux Freres. Lirac is on the acquisition list of many Chateauneuf du Pape proprietors for a number of reasons: (1) they live close by; (2)the terroir is not dissimilar from that of Chateauneuf du Pape; and (3) the land is relatively cheap. The 2010 Chateauneuf du Papes are superb. Wine Advocate.October, 2012

Tasting Notes
93
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